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PUBLIC OPINION > Keep Gaming Consoles on the Ground

SodaHead Gaming 2012/04/05 13:00:00
Technology is moving fast, and more media is going digital. Apple, Amazon, and Google are trying to launch "clouds" to hold music and media remotely so that you can access your database from wherever you are, Netflix has virtually demolished Blockbuster, and eReaders are putting bookstores out of business. Video games are the last frontier, and even those can be purchased digitally. But what if the next generation of consoles follow Apple's cloud system and start relying on virtual ownership? We asked the public if it would be willing to part with physical game ownership.

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It might clear some space on your DVD shelf, but there are just too many red flags going up on this one. One fear is that it will enable gaming companies to abuse subscription charges. Because games tend to require maintenance, patches, updates, and servers, the industry has a habit of charging more than a one-time fee. The Top Opinion noted, "If they try to turn online gaming into a 'pay-per-play' model, it will crash and burn." Plus, like audiophiles with music, there are a lot of gamers who just like the aesthetic of owning physical copies. One commenter wrote, "Aww but I like putting the little disc in!"

The Oldies Are OK With It

Obviously, the older voters got the less they cared about keeping their consoles, but there was one interesting thing to note here: It didn't start changing at all until voters got into their mid-40s. That means the NES generation is as hooked on consoles as the PS3 generation. Voters in their mid-50s could care less.

Liberals Won't Let Go

Usually, "liberal" is associated with change, while "conservative" is associated with keeping the tradition. Not here. On the political spectrum, liberals were more resistant to cloud gaming and virtual ownership. However, it could be argued that conservatives are typically older.

Drink Through It

If it gets down to the line, there's one demographic that's prepared to handle the cloudocalypse in a unique way. Drinkers are a good 10% more likely to let go of their consoles, possibly because they have something to lean on. Pay-to-play? How about a drink, instead?

If you'd like to vote on this question, dig deeper into the demographics, or engage in existing discussion about the topic, visit our poll about cloud gaming. We'd love to hear from you!
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Top Opinion

  • scum1 2012/04/05 21:11:22
    scum1
    +10
    Come on they sell games for 59 dollars. If I buy one it should be mine to keep or trade or sell. What if my internet is down? Then I would not be able to play from the "cloud". What if I live where I don't have good internet or just can't afford it?

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Opinions

  • Seamus Rooney 2012/05/11 01:50:22
    Seamus Rooney
    I like to have physical control over what is mine. Who's to stop them from just saying "You can't play anymore, I'm shutting it down." I've never been a strong supporter of others being in control of what's mine.
  • budgerigar42 2012/04/25 22:05:22 (edited)
    budgerigar42
    NOOOOOOOO!!!! XBOX! PS3! I LOVE YOU! DON'T LEAVE ME HEREEEEEE...

    nooooooo
  • Silversnake 2012/04/24 01:32:16
    Silversnake
    +2
    In my experience, virtual things are somewhat unreliable. If this one thing starts having a gliche then there goes all your crap
  • Ichigo Erben 2012/04/22 23:03:20
    Ichigo Erben
    +1
    For sure!^^
  • sadey mcmuffin 2012/04/21 22:26:37
  • SoCal71 2012/04/20 05:11:03
    SoCal71
    I download a lot of titles on Xbox 360 so I'm cool with doing away with discs all together. Just as long as we (a) get the games at wholesale price minus packaging costs. I'm not paying more than $24.99 - $29.99 for a new digital release and (b) they make hard drives larger in size and cheaper.
  • darazan 2012/04/16 18:39:39
    darazan
    The game companies are seriously considering this kind of step. They want to make it so people can never buy a "used game" because it will all be digital downloads. How does it hurt a game company's business for a single game disc to be sold twice? They make more money off of a single copy that way. Not to mention that if a game sucks, or you don't really care for it, it would be too bad, because you paid $60 non-refundable dollars for it, instead of even having an opportunity to buy it used to try it out and being able to recoup even a small amount of that if you don't like it.

    You could never let your friends borrow your game if digital format took over. Unless you let them borrow your console, that is. Neither could you bring your game to someone else's house to play without, again, bringing your console. That is ridiculous.

    I also wonder how (in the event of switching to a purely digital format) they will up the memory so that it could include all the games that would be in a gamer's library, if they even try. Would they expect gamers to buy more hard drives for their console in order to house all of their games? How is that practical? How will you remember which 50 games are on which hard drive? (That's just an example number)

    Aside from all that, there is nothing li...
    The game companies are seriously considering this kind of step. They want to make it so people can never buy a "used game" because it will all be digital downloads. How does it hurt a game company's business for a single game disc to be sold twice? They make more money off of a single copy that way. Not to mention that if a game sucks, or you don't really care for it, it would be too bad, because you paid $60 non-refundable dollars for it, instead of even having an opportunity to buy it used to try it out and being able to recoup even a small amount of that if you don't like it.

    You could never let your friends borrow your game if digital format took over. Unless you let them borrow your console, that is. Neither could you bring your game to someone else's house to play without, again, bringing your console. That is ridiculous.

    I also wonder how (in the event of switching to a purely digital format) they will up the memory so that it could include all the games that would be in a gamer's library, if they even try. Would they expect gamers to buy more hard drives for their console in order to house all of their games? How is that practical? How will you remember which 50 games are on which hard drive? (That's just an example number)

    Aside from all that, there is nothing like the satisfaction of standing in my living room, looking at the bookcases bought from Borders closing, and seeing them lined with physical books, movies, music, and games. I'd much rather have the real thing on my bookshelves than hard drives or consoles with digital versions of those things, no matter how space saving or innovative they are.
    (more)
  • Gregaj7 2012/04/15 23:06:38
    Gregaj7
    If I had one, I'd want to keep it, except in the case of physical upgrade.
  • Molko-Addict 2012/04/15 00:28:26
    Molko-Addict
    well I'd do both... Normally I first buy stuff online and If i like it I purchase it physically so I can touch the box and read the manual, kindda silly but I like collecting CDs and videogames.
  • Reaper 2012/04/14 06:40:06
    Reaper
    i'd do both.
  • Maci 2012/04/12 21:54:02
  • Kit_Kat 2012/04/12 03:12:33
  • charles_1 2012/04/08 17:27:37
    charles_1
    +1
    Cloud gaming has some pluses. But I do not want to part with stand alone games.

    Games in the cloud can be played on any computer anywhere. A nice plus.

    But the negatives are substantial. The game company has way too much control. They can start and stop the game when they want. Your account is venerable to international hacking and when it happens, they are little to no help to resolve it.

    You can't just keep playing an old version if you don't like the changes the developer is making. They like to introduce changes that cost money to force you to buy things to stay competitive. Often, you have to play 24/7 to stay "in-the-game" because "serious gamers" are playing like that. So casual play can often be discouraging. Teams of "serious players" come in an take advantage of every hack, cheat, and exploit, to get ahead. You can't get ahead of these organized teams and the game deteriorates to who is in the "clique". It becomes very "high school" in mentality and game play. I've even seen game moderators and developers playing the games and of course they are always on top, gee I wonder why.
  • ElephantChristianConservative7 2012/04/08 05:15:36
    ElephantChristianConservative7
    +1
    I'm not too comfortable with parting with the old gaming consoles because they are more simplified and teaches kids and young people to appreciate and respect not only what they have but history as well.
  • KB Elephan... 2012/04/12 20:00:25
    KB
    +2
    hell yes! I love some of the new technology that's coming out, especially for video games, but knowing what video games were like before all this cloud garbage came out, and were it all began is very important as well.
  • CAPISCE 2012/04/08 00:59:38
    CAPISCE
    +1
    Here's an idea-----go the hell outside
  • Sandman366 2012/04/06 13:00:37
    Sandman366
    +2
    I prefer PC games....
    ....but consoles are here to stay. And I'd defend a couple of them too. Especially the PS2, even if I've got an emulator for it. Thing was a classic. (Early 360/PS3/Wii wars were won by PS2, definitely.)
  • EliteAmongOutcasts 2012/04/06 12:37:34
  • freakoutnow... cuz mom's here 2012/04/06 05:45:42
    freakoutnow... cuz mom's here
    +4
    The biggest problem with ''cloud'' services in the long term is that they aren't very realistic. Not everyone has reliable internet service that is fast and modern. Not everyone has internet at home either. If the server or Internet is down than you can't play or buy games. Also there could be a backlash from everything going digital. You mention audiophiles but fail to mention the spectrum of audiophiles. Some audiophiles want physical copies of all thier music while others only own physical copies of the music that they truely cherish. Gamers are the same way. The amount of audiophiles are growing. Many young people are serious audiophiles because that's how mom & dad listened to music when they were kids. Plus there are those who've been burned by digital movie, music, and game services. The game can be on the virtual console one day and gone the next. All it has to have happen to be removed from virtual console game services is for the person who owns the license to not renew thier deal with the licensee.
  • Daniel S 2012/04/06 03:46:56
  • AcidShocker 2012/04/06 03:29:39
    AcidShocker
    +1
    I will never part with any of my consoles, who knows when you'll ever run into one of them again, you'll start to regret selling them, then you'll be sad until you finally see one again, then your memories would start rushing back, and you'll wonder why you sold it.
    *true story*
  • Angela Chambers 2012/04/06 02:51:23
    Angela Chambers
    +1
    Absolutely not!! I like my consoles.
  • hari 2012/04/06 02:02:44
    hari
    Agreed as got stuck for some other work and do not have more time to spend for games
  • Wolf 2012/04/06 01:47:37
    Wolf
    +3
    i don't like buying virtual copies of games and storing them on a service doesn't seem like you totally own it
  • Zamboni - Madoka Magica fan... 2012/04/06 00:34:57
    Zamboni - Madoka Magica fan BN0
    No. It's easier to censor if videogame consols become virtual.
  • Kizzume 2012/04/05 23:55:47
    Kizzume
    +1
    I can't tinker, mod, or do much of anything with a "cloud" game other than play it the way it was designed to be played. I get bored quickly with most games and like to tinker with them somewhat soon after I get them.
  • abubincrazy 2012/04/05 22:53:38
    abubincrazy
    +3
    Gaming, my rectal aperture!
    "Cloud" computing imparts all of your private data to God-knows-who.
    This is idiocy.
    When do we all get branded, I mean ID-chipped by the Big-Brotherocracy?

    MOOOOooooooo~!!!
  • Sterling 2012/04/05 22:28:58
    Sterling
    +2
    Games are already doing this, and it works. They will likely implement some sort of trade option into the system (with Kindle you can lend friends books), where you can lend or give away your games. I don't think they have a return option yet but they will probably get that as well when more people start buying just the digital copies. This is just the way technology is moving.

    Also I don't want to get political but liberals don't always like progress (although I agree they like to associate themselves with it). For instance, how many liberals have you ever seen who are happy when some advancement in business results in greater efficiency but a loss of jobs... for instance remember when Obama claimed that ATMs were partly to blame for unemployment? The same thing happened with the invention of the tractor. Since that invention we have lost millions of jobs in agriculture, but we have more food, lower prices, and millions of people free to pursue OTHER jobs.

    The same can loosely be applied to video games in this instance. Sure it will take a while for it to be fully implemented, it will take a while for everyone to have modern internet connections, but for me, I don't want to own a physical copy of the game. I don't want to worry about losing it. It's much easier to download it, not have to pay for shipping, not have to wait, and if my computer ever crashes it will be right there to download again when I fix it.
  • Warfinge Sterling 2012/04/06 11:48:35
    Warfinge
    I don't think you can compare the game developing industry to other models that closely. Cloud based game sales are the wave of the future and it is working....for the industry. Some are not so bad like Valve and Steampowered.com. At least they give some useful services for the annoyance of ownership licensing. Instant game patching, server listing and game matching, They have a great social system with your friends list and the ability to see which of your friends play your games etc. Pretty slick UI but it is still built around the premise you need to be kept in line to prevent piracy no matter how attractive it is.
    You can't compare to DVDs or music because by law, you have a right to make archival copies of that media. Not so if you read game EULAs with games. One copy per customer per license. The important thing about cloud tech to remember is that no matter how much you spend for use of software, you own nothing tangible. Businesses come and go. THere is a risk in investing in life-long rental of anything.
  • Paula 2012/04/05 21:28:37
  • scum1 2012/04/05 21:11:22
    scum1
    +10
    Come on they sell games for 59 dollars. If I buy one it should be mine to keep or trade or sell. What if my internet is down? Then I would not be able to play from the "cloud". What if I live where I don't have good internet or just can't afford it?
  • M-Shane 2012/04/05 20:34:38
    M-Shane
    +3
    There are some things that the industries cannot touch, video games is one of them, and they've already gone too far with the eReaders, so what's the use complaining with that one...
  • BwaHa 2012/04/05 19:25:59
    BwaHa
    +1
    I'm not okay with it but then again, technology's taking us there whether we like it or not.
  • Judog10 2012/04/05 18:41:31
    Judog10
    +3
    Yes, please.
  • Warfinge 2012/04/05 17:47:28
    Warfinge
    +5
    Cloud gaming and paying for the rights to play a game without physical ownership of anything tangible is the future. I have fought it, my fellow players have fought it. From 7 or 8 year long active threads in Amazon's forums to tiffs in other forums, so many active posters in these battles are participants in the video game industry. They range from development, marketing to peripheral jobs dependant to video game revenue and they are bitterly vocal on no consumer ever actually owning anything except the right to play the games. With a strong argument backed with incredible stats of piracy of PC games. They are avid and very loud in these arguments. Personally, I think the piracy stats are skewed and inaccurate.
    Most players in my opinion are on board for whatever they must do to play the games. Not many gamers actually game for more than 5 to 7 years before they move to other things like adulthood, relationships families etc. Many still game but their interest is much lower. So I think of it as new players washing in like waves on the video game market. With each wave, the justification for cloud gaming becomes easier to sell.
    My recent personal experience set in stone for me what cloud gaming is really going to be like. EA Games has published many of the titles I own...
    Cloud gaming and paying for the rights to play a game without physical ownership of anything tangible is the future. I have fought it, my fellow players have fought it. From 7 or 8 year long active threads in Amazon's forums to tiffs in other forums, so many active posters in these battles are participants in the video game industry. They range from development, marketing to peripheral jobs dependant to video game revenue and they are bitterly vocal on no consumer ever actually owning anything except the right to play the games. With a strong argument backed with incredible stats of piracy of PC games. They are avid and very loud in these arguments. Personally, I think the piracy stats are skewed and inaccurate.
    Most players in my opinion are on board for whatever they must do to play the games. Not many gamers actually game for more than 5 to 7 years before they move to other things like adulthood, relationships families etc. Many still game but their interest is much lower. So I think of it as new players washing in like waves on the video game market. With each wave, the justification for cloud gaming becomes easier to sell.
    My recent personal experience set in stone for me what cloud gaming is really going to be like. EA Games has published many of the titles I own. I bought a few over Christmas on Origin, their Steam Store knock-off. BF3 was one of the games and some Sims stuff etc. I also play their Free to Play game Need for Speed World which like most free online games, sells items in-game with a payment scheme where you buy “Speed Boost” in block increments of $20, $25, $50 and $110. With that cash, you can in turn buy specific cars, upgrades, power-ups and the like...pretty fun… kind of expensive if you aren’t careful. Anyway, I bought a car and it was bugged and came significantly less than was promised. I went to the game’s support forum and complained with like 30 others and after about 3 weeks of being ignored, I filed a support ticket with EA support. This went on and on. I had two different support reps based in India giving me form responses that did not fit the problem. I was getting one response per day that did nothing except please provide the information for your problem. I filed a dispute with PayPal because I had used PayPal to pay for the purchase. OK…now this is where it get’s relevant to cloud gaming and possible problems. They locked my accounts. ALL OF THEM. Anything that required log-on through EA. BF-3, Crysis 2… all that required EA log-in to play. Well needless to say I was angry. I steamed about it all day. In the evening, I found a phone number on the web for others with a similar problem and I called. A really polite rep looked at my problem and said he didn’t get it. That nobody in EA should be able to do what was done to me. He said my account (Accounts really because I have over 20 games registered with EA) were all logged as fraudulent. No description of what fraud in particular of course. He fixed the problem yay! But what if he hadn’t? What if he had just went with it and said, you are a criminal and may not use our games anymore?
    Do we read EULAs? Really read them? No. If we did most of us wouldn’t agree. I think the cloud strategy is going at the piracy problem from the wrong end. Enforcement is the way to go. Bust pirates, break torrent sites, stop torrent services. Punish the guilty and you will have less guilty. Stop punishing the paying customer. It’s obviously not working and never will.
    (more)
  • Sew Warfinge 2012/04/06 16:15:47
    Sew
    I agree I, absolutely abhor having to have a internet connection and some account to play a non-online game. I recently got angry about having to make an account for Skyrim. Its getting to the point where I have more of this accounts then I can keep up with and I hate how Steam sends advertisements to me. I would love to be able to play where I don't have an internet connection as its a great single player game but I can't. Also I do fear that if games are in the "clouds" we could eventually being paying subscriptions or dealing with greater invasions, imagine having a little advertisement scrolling bar pop up at the bottom of your screen while you're playing a game or something.
  • Warfinge Sew 2012/08/18 23:47:51 (edited)
    Warfinge
    http://www.amazon.com/forum/p...

    Go here. Read "Why is Steam suddenly bad? " Read it all and sound off.

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